Statements of Solidarity

The Resource Centers would like to provide current statements on political issues. Scroll below to read them. The statements are listed in order from newest to oldest.  


    A Statement from AARCC Director Shonté Thomas

  • A Statement from AARCC Director Shonté Thomas 

    “To be a Negro in this country and to be relatively conscious is to be in a rage almost all the time. ” ― James Baldwin


    The (original) font for this statement was “Oxygen”. Black people want to breathe. The senseless and brutal public lynchings of Black bodies is rooted in white supremacy and necessitates AARCC to promulgate yet another statement. This statement will not remedy the disease that is racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, but maybe this time it will cause our non-Black communities to take stock of how there are contributing factors at play. Each time you share a photo of a lifeless Black person, Black people feel that hurt. Each time you are silent on matters that could greatly benefit Black people, Black people feel that hurt. And each time you disparage an uprising as we see in Minneapolis, but do not seek comparable condemnation for a riot due to a sporting event, Black people feel that hurt. This will not be the last time a Black person is murdered at the hand of another person solely due to the color of their skin. 


    To my Black community, yes we are tired. Tired from all the ways the barrage of our generational trauma continues to impact and impede our collective growth. Please PROTECT YOUR ENERGY, today and tomorrow. Take social media breaks. Find your outlet for counteracting the harm. Sit in your pain, cry, and allow time to grieve. There is no time limitation to your sadness for the state of our reality, but know and hear this, your beauty and brilliance is evident. You will always matter and the world needs you. You contribute far beyond than the over consumed and commodification of Black culture would leave many to believe. As a resource center at UCSC, we are given the opportunity to support students, staff, and the UCSC community. Regardless of the remote reality, we are here for you. If you are in need of support during this time (and any time), please contact us; Shonté Thomas, sfthomas@ucsc.edu, and Dr. Aaron Jones, ajones10@ucsc.edu


    For my non-Black people, if you want to support Black people at this time, take heed of the following suggestions which are in no particular order. 

    • STOP sharing photos of lifeless Black bodies. This is beyond traumatic and we have an endless stock of other images stained into our consciousness.

    • Check-in on your Black friends-- something as simple as a text/call can be beneficial. 

    • Collect your people. The murderers responsible for the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, Tony McDade, and countless others all likely have parents, families, children, church family, etc. Call in racist/biased actions you see in your immediate community. If you are raising children, take time to talk to them about the underlying common fabric of this country, racism-- systematically, structurally, and institutional. Talk to them about Anti-Blackness. 

    • Actively work to be anti-racist because it is not enough to be non-racist. This week, when the woman in Central Park called the cops on Christian Cooper, she knew exactly what she was doing and it could have cost him his life. 

    • Do your research to be a better human -- and an accomplice; See the list below too.  

    • Financially support organizations working hard to remedy the inequities put upon Black people and others with minoritized identities. 


    The problems of poverty, crime, healthcare, unemployment, education remain significant in cities across this country for many, but the immense disparities for Black people are empirically evident. As we reflect on the recent loss of Black lives, we need more people to take initiative, learn from the ills and lessons of our past, and work each day to uphold Black people’s desire to want to breathe.  


    “As we commit to each other to build this movement of resistance and liberation, no one can be an afterthought. We have a chance to be stronger and better than we ever have before- and that starts with having hard conversations and being held accountable.” - Raquel Wilis, Women’s March 2017 speech


    With love and sadness,

    Shonté Thomas
    Director, African American Resource & Cultural Center
    University of California, Santa Cruz

    ******************

    RESOURCES:


    Black Lives Matter Chapter: https://blacklivesmatter.com/chapters/

    To contact your congress representative


    Books:

    Bell, D. (1987). And We Are Not Saved: The Elusive Quest for Racial Justice. New York, NY: Basic Books.

    Ladson-Billings, G. (1995). Toward a theory of culturally relevant pedagogy. American Education Research Journal, 32(3), 465-491. 

    Goldrick-Rab et. al, (2019). College and University Basic Needs Insecurity: A National #RealCollege Survey Report. Retrieved from https://hope4college.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/HOPE_realcollege_National_report_digital.pdf 

    Grier-Reid, T.L. (2010). The African American student network: Creating sanctuaries and counterspaces for coping with racial microaggressions in higher education settings. Journal of Humanistic Counseling, Education, and Development, 49, 181-188.

    Kendi, I.X. (2016). Stamped from the beginning: The definitive history of racist ideas in America. New York, NY: Nation Books. 

    Kendi, I.X. (2019). How to be antiracist. New York, NY: One World. 

    Integrated Postsecondary Education Data Systems (IPEDS) - http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/datacenter/

    McHenry, D. (1987). Dean McHenry: The university of California Santa Cruz, Early Campus History, 1958-1969. Retrieved from: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/6rv1h8fv  

    The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education (2006). Black Student College Graduation Rates Remain Low, But Modest Progress Begins to Show. New York, N.Y: CH II Publishers.

    National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). 2016 Digest of Education Statistics (List of 2016 Digest Tables). Washington D.C.: Institute of Education Statistics. U.S. Department of Education.

    Ricard, R., & Brown, M.C. (2008). Ebony towers in higher education: The evolution, mission, and presidency of historically Black colleges and universities. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

    Strayhorn, T.L. (2012). College student sense of belonging: A key to educational success for all students. New York, NY: Routledge.

    University of California, Information Center: https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/infocenter

    Wilder, C.S. (2013). Ebony and ivy: Race, slavery, and the troubled history of America’s universities. New York, NY: Bloomsbury Press.

    Yosso, T.J., & Lopez, C.B. (2010). Counterspaces in a hostile place: A critical race theory analysis of campus culture centers. In Patton, L.D. (Ed.). Culture centers in higher education: Perspectives on identity, theory, and practice. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

     

    blm-literature


  • Open Letter from AA/PIRC re: COVID-19

  • Open Letter from AA/PIRC re: COVID-19

    April 10, 2020


    Dear UC Santa Cruz Community:

    On behalf of the Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center, I sincerely hope this message finds you, and your loved ones in good health and in good spirits.

    The sudden global impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has ushered our campus, along with the rest of the world, into uncharted territory requiring drastic measures, and everyone should take on the responsibility to address this common adversary.  I would like to take this opportunity to remind the UCSC community that the adversary is a virus and not a community of people.

    A constant flow of new updates provides us with evidence that demonstrates how the pandemic is disproportionately impacting already marginalized communities. The percentage of related deaths of the black residents of Chicago, the impact on the undocumented community, tribal communities, and in the LGBTQ community, are a few examples.  It has been abundantly clear though, that this pandemic has brought to the surface, blatant xenophobia and racism targeting Asian communities across the globe.  There has been a drastic rise of reports of racist attacks targeting Asian Americans nationwide.

    Anti-Asian racism and xenophobia are not new to the Asian American experience; the history of Yellow Peril, to the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, Japanese American Internment and the story of Vincent Chin, are just a few historic examples of Asian and Asian Americans being targeted as something to fear and blame. Current reports have ranged from online harassment to fatally violent incidents. NONE of it is acceptable.

     

    To our AA/PI Banana Slugs who are directly impacted by these incidents:  I write to remind you all that you did not cause this pandemic, and you are not to blame. Your sadness, hurt, frustration, and fear of being targeted are valid responses. Whether that leads you to speak out against oppression in all forms, to do what you can to take care of yourself or to change how you present yourself to others are all very understandable reactions.  I also want to emphasize that YOU ARE NOT the problem, and it is not your responsibility to change how others perceive you. If you have been the target of harassment or violence, if you are fearful of being targeted, or simply want to connect and be in community, AA/PIRC and the other campus Resource Centers are working diligently to provide opportunities to connect with virtual programs to support and encourage you during these times.

     

    Another form of support comes from one of our campus partners from Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS). Dr. Audrey Kim has extended an invitation for students to engage with her during her Let’s Talk, drop-in sessions on Tuesdays 1-3 pm via Zoom (Meeting ID: 831 459 1373; Password: 561863).  


    To our Banana Slugs who want to support those directly impacted by these incidents:

    I appreciate your compassion and care for your UCSC community.  Please continue to reach out and support your fellow Banana Slugs. You can be most helpful by understanding your own biases and doing the work to unlearn them. Resist the urge to be silent or complicit in the Anti-Asian sentiments and violence that are on the rise.  Please continue to educate yourselves on Asian American experiences, and have the difficult conversations with people you are close to and challenge assumptions and biases.

    Additionally, if you have been targeted by harassment or violence, or have witnessed an incident involving a UCSC community member, even while attending UCSC remotely, I also encourage you:

     

    AND/OR 

     

    • at the STOP AAPI HATE reporting page [This reporting center is not affiliated with UCSC, but was founded by the Asian Pacific Policy and Planning Council (A3PCON), Chinese for Affirmative Action (CAA) and San Francisco State University’s Asian American Studies Department].

    It is my hope that this message will serve as a continuation of dialogue, and community building to support the AA/PI community of UCSC, and further the goal of supporting all marginalized communities of UCSC.

    You can stay connected to AA/PIRC by adding to our e-newsletter mailing list and following our Facebook and Instagram accounts. AA/PIRC Staff also hosting virtual office hours via Zoom: 

    https://ucsc.zoom.us/j/849939108 

    Mondays & Wednesdays @ 2 - 4 pm; Thursdays @ 10 am - 12 pm


    For additional support and resources from the UCSC campus, you can visit:

     

    Please do not hesitate to reach out should you have questions, to let us know how you are being impacted by COVID-19, or if you would like to discuss anything in this message in more depth.

    Wishing you good health and safety for you and your loved ones.


    In solidarity,

    Caz Salamanca
    Director, Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center

  • COVID-19 Response Statement

  • UCSC RESOURCE CENTERS

    MESSAGE TO STUDENTS

    We at the UCSC Resources Centers want to assure students that we are here for you. The Ethnic Resource Centers, Cantú Queer Center, and Women’s Center will be closed due to the county-wide Shelter in Place order and campus directive until further notice. However, all of our staff members are working remotely and available by phone, email, and video conferencing. We recognize that there are many messages coming to your inbox, and the rapid changes at UCSC can be overwhelming during an already stressful time while studying for finals. We want to offer some words of encouragement. 

    Community is more than physical proximity and geographic location. 

    Community is a feeling, and Resource Center staff seek to keep our community strong. We recognize the challenges that have come with recent UCSC guidelines to finish winter quarter online, return home if possible, take online courses in the spring quarter, and cancel or postpone events and gatherings. However, our work is about creating spaces for students to find community, and the RC team has already begun to think of creative ways to re-envision programs and meet our mission to provide opportunities for community connection to feel close with one another.

    Stay connected. Reach out & ask for help. 

    Let’s reframe “social distancing” to “physical distancing”. We encourage you to stay connected virtually. Connect with us by phone, e-mail, and video conferencing. Connect with our communities through social media, as we will use those mediums to share information and host virtual events. Mental and physical health is so important during these times of stress, please reach out. It’s okay to need help, and it’s okay to ask for help. Below are some services that will continue to be operational during this time. We encourage you to utilize them to help combat feelings of isolation. And as collaborative partners, we welcome students to share ideas and feedback on ways to support you and your peers during this time.

    During this unprecedented time, the Resource Centers are mindful of university safety measures and prioritizing the health and safety of our communities. At the same time, staff remains committed to providing you with the things we most need right now: comfort, kindness, laughter, and (virtual) time together. 

    Our communities are strong. We are resilient. We will work through all of these changes together.



    RESOURCE CENTERS
    Nancy I. Kim, Resource Centers Executive Director nikim@ucsc.edu
    Cameron de León, Office Manager, cajdeleo@ucsc.edu
    Ethnic Resource Centers
    FB: @ucsc.erc
    IG: @ucsc.erc

    African American Resource and Cultural Center
    Shonté Thomas, Director sfthomas@ucsc.edu
    Dr. Aaron Jones, Associate Director ajones10@ucsc.edu 
    FB: @aarcc.ucsc
    IG: @ucsc_aarcc 

    American Indian Resource Center
    airc@ucsc.edu
    Dr. Rebecca Hernandez, Director rhernandez@ucsc.edu
    Jemzi Ortiz, Program Coordinator jortizfr@ucsc.edu
    FB: @AIRC.UCSC
    IG: @aircucsc 

    Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center 
    aapirc@ucsc.edu
    Caz Salamanca, Director cazs@ucsc.edu
    Collette Quach, Program Coordinator coequach@ucsc.edu
    FB: @aapirc
    IG: @aapirc_ucsc
    Tik Tok: @ucsc_aapirc

    EL CENTRO: Chicanx Latinx Resource Center
    Dr. Judith Estrada, Director judi@ucsc.edu
    Carlos Gutierrez, Program Coordinator caalguti@ucsc.edu 
    IG: @elcentro_ucsc

    Lionel Cantú Queer Resource Center
    Travis S. Becker, Director trbecker@ucsc.edu
    Ky Borunda, He/Him, Trans Education Specialist kborunda@ucsc.edu
    FB: @cantuqueercenter
    IG: @cantuqueercenter 

    Women’s Center
    women@ucsc.edu 
    Colleen Rice, Director corice@ucsc.edu
    Roxanna Diaz, Program Coordinator rdiaz419@ucsc.edu 
    FB: @UCSCwomen
    IG: @ucsc.women 

    HEALTH SERVICES

    Student Health Services (including the Medical Services, Pharmacy, Laboratory, Optometry, CAPS, CARE, and SHOP) will remain open for students who will be remaining on campus. 

    Medical visits: To speak with a Student Health Center nurse during business hours or during after-hours call: 831-459-2591.

    Mental health visits: To speak to Counseling and Psychological Services counselors, psychiatrists, and case managers call 831-459-2628 during business hours. For after-hour support, call 831-459-2628, and select option 3 from the automated menu. 

    Additional online care options:

    LiveHealth Online: Have secure, online video visits with licensed mental health professionals. LiveHealth online has a co-pay and no referral is needed.

    Therapy Assistance Online and WellTrack: Use interactive tools and self-care exercises for mental health concerns.


  • UCSC Resource Centers Statement on Thirty Meter Telescope

  • screen-shot-2019-09-16-at-1.06.18-pm1.png 

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Artwork by Joey Montoya (Lipan Apache), @joeymontoya on Instagram

    The UCSC Resource Centers stand in solidarity with the Native Hawaiian community in their opposition to the building of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) on Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawai’i. This 18-story telescope will destroy sacred lands and cause substantial impact on the ecosystems of the island overall. 

    Our centers are here to support Native Hawaiian students on campus and to raise awareness about the issues that Indigenous communities currently face. We are here, we are paying attention, we know what is just. We look to all leaders involved with this project to stop this desecration of sacred land for the good of all of us. 

    We also support the Amah Mutsun Tribal Band in their efforts to Protect Juristac, which are their sacred grounds near Gilroy, California that is being threatened by a mining project that would destroy 320 acres of the land. This petition is circulating online, and there are public action meetings taking place at the Resource Center for Non-violence over the next few weeks where people can learn more about how to support. Visit their website to read other statements of support.

     

    University of California, Santa Cruz

    African American Resource & Cultural Center

    American Indian Resource Center

    Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center

    Lionel Cantú Queer Center

    El Centro: Chicanx Latinx Resource Center

    Women's Center


  • We Demand Justice!

  • Sacramento protest in response to the Stephon Clark tragedy

    On March 18, 2018, an unarmed young Black man, Stephon Clark, was a victim of a police shooting in Sacramento. Our hearts ache for the Clark family, the Sacramento community, and the many victims of violence. This tragedy is not just a local matter, nor is it an isolated incident in our state or our country. This is a matter of national consciousness and our struggle to combat oppressive systems that are deeply rooted in racism. We demand justice! Say his name: Stephon Clark!

    On March  27, 2018, the Louisiana Attorney General announced that no charges will be filed against two Baton Rouge police officers in the 2016 shooting death of Alton Sterling after an investigation determined that the shooting was justified. This too is another example of deeply rooted racism in our country that disproportionately impacts the African American community. We must speak up and demand justice.

    The Educational Opportunity Programs (EOP), the Ethnic Resource Centers, the Lionel Cantú Resource Center, and the Women’s Center are direct descendants and products of the Civil Rights Movement. Our missions are grounded in social movements to disrupt racism, sexism, homophobia, and oppressive systems to increase opportunities for communities historically excluded from higher education. It is our duty to speak out, and we urge ourselves and our community to build equity in our society through peaceful means. We remain committed to our history, to speaking out and demanding justice! We are here to support all students as they process these most recent incidents and we are committed to providing support and connecting students with resources to grow and demand justice!

    This statement is issued on behalf of UCSC Educational Opportunity Programs, African American Cultural and Resource Center, American Indian Resource Center, Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center, El Centro: Chicanx Latinx Resource Center, Lionel Cantú Resource Center, and the Women’s Center.


  • Resource Centers Joint Statement on DACA

  • MESSAGE TO UNDOCUMENTED STUDENTS AT UC SANTA CRUZ

    In anticipation of the White House administration’s announcement regarding changes to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, the UCSC Resource Centers reaffirm our commitment and full support of and to all undocumented students.

    We strongly condemn any action or policy that further strips already limited protections from undocumented youth, as this is in direct conflict with the values and mission of our work. Our message and steadfast commitment to undocumented students remain the same:

    The UCSC Resource Centers reiterate that we move in solidarity with, and will continue to advocate for Muslims, refugees and undocumented citizens, queer and trans folk, people with disabilities, people of color, Indigenous communities, women and all of the people at the various intersections of these identities.  We recognize that students and campus community members may feel that our initial fears of hateful rhetoric during the elections are becoming a disturbing reality in policy and practice. This is not normal. And the community response, the voice, and the power of everyday people organizing has been extraordinary.

    We are strong. We are resilient. We are here for you. We are moving forward together.

    The Resource Centers will continue to hold space for folks to process, to breathe, and to come together as a community. We will support students in overcoming any barriers they encounter as a result of these and future unjust and oppressive actions. We encourage students to take advantage of support services and invite students to contact staff members by phone or email if you don’t feel comfortable coming into the office.

    RESOURCE CENTERS resourcecenters.ucsc.edu

    African American Resource and Cultural Center aarcc.ucsc.edu

    American Indian Resource Center airc.ucsc.edu

    Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center aapirc.ucsc.edu

    El Centro: Chicanx Latinx Resource Center elcentro.ucsc.edu

    Lionel Cantú Queer Center queer.ucsc.edu

    Women’s Center womenscenter.ucsc.edu


    RESOURCES

    Educational Opportunity Programs eop.ucsc.edu

    Undocumented Student Services located at Educational Opportunity Programs: http://eop.ucsc.edu/undocumented_student_services/index.html

    Educators For Fair Consideration (E4FC) e4fc.org


  • AARCC Statement on Police Brutality and #BlackLivesMatter

  • STATEMENT FROM UCSC RESOURCE CENTERS

    African American Resource and Cultural Center - AARCC DiasporaAmerican Indian Resource CenterUCSC Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource CenterEl Centro: Chicano Latino Resource CenterCantú Queer Center, and UCSC Women's Center

    It is with deep love, respect, and solidarity with Director Shonté Thomas, UCSC African American Resource and Cultural Center, and the community it serves, we encourage you all to read the following statement and unite with us in healing and positive reflective action.

    RESOURCE CENTERS resourcecenters.ucsc.edu

    African American Resource and Cultural Center aarcc.ucsc.edu

    American Indian Resource Center airc.ucsc.edu

    Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center aapirc.ucsc.edu

    El Centro: Chicanx Latinx Resource Center elcentro.ucsc.edu

    Lionel Cantú Queer Center queer.ucsc.edu

    Women’s Center womenscenter.ucsc.edu

    STATEMENT FROM THE AFRICAN AMERICAN RESOURCE AND CULTURAL CENTER

    "In the last 72 hours, the African American Resource and Cultural Center (AARCC) and the world has watched in shock and horror at the hands of law enforcement, the death of two Black bodies, Alton Sterling and Philando Castille. As a resource center at UCSC, we are given the opportunity to support students, staff, and the UCSC community and regardless of the summer break, we are here for you. If you are in need of support during this time (and any time), please contact the center at (831) 459-3561 or sfthomas@ucsc.edu

    It is also very important to acknowledge, no single individual can dictate how you process these events. It is understood that we all exercise, express, and experience these matters in varying ways, ranging in a myriad of emotions, from rage, anger, fear, sadness, to the feeling of displacement of how you actually feel. As the inundation of videos, articles, opinions, and justifications are on 24-hour stream, please do not feel obligated to engage. Feel free to disconnect and take time for yourself. On-campus, there are also other support systems on campus via the Counseling And Psychological Services (CAPS) (831) 499-1942.

    It was hard to bear witness to the countless other lives we have lost in recent years and no words, thoughts, or prayers can console the families and friends of our lost daughters, sons, brothers, sisters, et. al. It is practically impossible for many of us to articulate and express the magnitude at which we absorb these losses -- many are in a constant state of numbness. Alton Sterling and Philando Castile are now counted among the 530+ people who have been killed by police in the United States in 2016. The families of the unarmed victims (like Rekia Boyd, Freddie Gray, Sandra Bland, Oscar Grant, Tamar Rice to name a few) deserve justice, and more importantly, that person, who lost their life, deserves respect. We need these officers held accountable, criminally. Too many times, people lose their lives, and police officers are not indicted or they are acquitted at trial. The only way we will see change is when officers who commit criminal acts go to prison.

    Now to our allies, it is your time to center the experiences and lives of the Black community. It is important to tell the Black people in your life that they do in fact matter. It is necessary for you to continue to fight alongside the Black community as coalition building is a highly effective mechanism to bring about change. Use your privileges to bring greater awareness to the systemic and institutional racial injustices seen and exhibited within the structures of this country -- law enforcement, local/state/federal government. We need more people like Abdul Muflahi, the store owner who decried the accounts of the police and whom spoke positively of the relationship between him and Alton Sterling. Allies, we need you to “collect your folks” and silence the negative rhetoric to defame the lives of those we have lost.

    As a nation, what do we do from here? This is a loaded question and many have weighed in and this will not be a comprehensive list, but AARCC welcomes input, feedback, and ways to partner and thwart these imbalances which exist. There is a grave sense of hopelessness, despair, and anger. This matter is not an issue of Black people vs. White people. It is not an issue of Black people vs cops. It is, however, a global issue of anti-Blackness as a result of systems of oppression rooted in White supremacy. There are rallies, vigils, and town halls being organized around the country; We will host an opportunity in the coming days. Support these efforts and be prepared to outline what we need and want as a community. Another way to combat the system of white supremacy is through direct government action. Congress can move the needle. These are elected officials, that we nominated into office and they are accountable to us -- all of us! You can write and call your local government and demand change. The Department of Justice needs to investigate and prosecute each and every one of these cases. The same people that govern the police departments, typically govern the school boards, local politics, etc. The training of all police cadets/ officers needs to be revamped and implement long-overdue reforms to police tactics (i.e., de-escalation practices). We need to de-militarize the police and move as far from a police state model as possible -- funnel more of that funding back into the community and educational initiatives. We need to expand the opportunities for citizen involvement in police departments. We need the police to represent the community in which it serves and to have an invested interest in the citizenry it protects. We also need honest police officers to stand up and speak out against wrongdoing.

    The problems of poverty, crime, unemployment, and neglect remain significant in cities across this country. As we reflect on the lives and deaths of Alton Sterling and Philando Castille, we need more people to be amenable to having tough and critical conversations, draw from the lessons, confront the mistakes of past policies, laws, behaviors and work to resolve the racial and economic inequities of this country in which we all reside.

    To my beautiful Black community, we see you. You matter. Your life matters. It always has and it always will.

    Peace and Love,

    Shonté Thomas, M.Ed
    Pronouns: She/Her
    Director, African American Resource & Cultural Center
    University of California, Santa Cruz
    (831) 459-3561 
    aarcc.ucsc.edu

    To contact your congress representative: www.congress.gov/members
    To contact Louisiana in protest of Alton Sterling: https://www.legis.la.gov/legis/FindMyLegislators.aspx
    To contact Minnesota in protest of Philando Castile: https://www.leg.state.mn.us


  • Joint Statement on Presidential Election Results

  • STATEMENT FROM UCSC RESOURCE CENTERS

    African American Resource and Cultural Center, American Indian Resource Center, Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center, El Centro: Chicanx Latinx Resource Center, Lionel Cantú Queer Center, and Women’s Center

    The results of the 2016 National Election have been confirmed. Many of us will be negatively affected by these results. The UCSC Resource Centers stand in solidarity with and will continue to advocate for Muslims, refugees and undocumented citizens, queer and trans folk, disabled folk, people of color, and women. We recognize that students and campus community members may feel dismayed or fearful about what is to come. Unfortunately, adversity is not new to our communities.

    We are strong. We are resilient. We are here for you. We will move forward together.

    The Resource Centers will hold space for folks to process, to breathe, and to come together as a community. Coffee, tea, and snacks will be available. Drop by the Ethnic Resource Centers (3rd floor, Bay Tree Building) and Lionel Cantú Queer Center (behind Crown circle). The Women’s Center facility at Cardiff House will be closed for the day, and staff will be available at the Ethnic Resource Centers.

     

    RESOURCE CENTERS resourcecenters.ucsc.edu

    African American Resource and Cultural Center aarcc.ucsc.edu

    American Indian Resource Center airc.ucsc.edu

    Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center aapirc.ucsc.edu

    El Centro: Chicanx Latinx Resource Center elcentro.ucsc.edu

    Lionel Cantú Queer Center queer.ucsc.edu

    Women’s Center womenscenter.ucsc.edu


  • Joint Statement on Executive Orders from RCs, EOP, and DRC

  • JOINT STATEMENT ON EXECUTIVE ORDERS

    In his first ten days in office, the President with support of the current administration has signed Executive Orders that are in opposition to our core values of diversity, social and environmental justice, family, community, and basic humanity. His Executive Orders advanced construction of Dakota Access Pipeline, as well as a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. Most recently, he ordered a travel ban and detaining of immigrants and refugees from seven predominantly Muslim countries, despite those travelers having visas and green cards.

    The UCSC Resource Centers, with Educational Opportunity Programs and the Disability Resource Center, reiterate that we stand in solidarity with, and will continue to advocate for Muslims, refugees and undocumented citizens, queer and trans folk, people with disabilities, people of color, Indigenous communities, women and all of the people at the various intersections of these identities.  We recognize that students and campus community members may feel that our initial fears of hateful rhetoric during the elections are becoming a disturbing reality in policy and practice. This is not normal. And the community response, the voice, and the power of everyday people organizing has been extraordinary.

    We are strong. We are resilient. We are here for you. We are moving forward together.

    The Resource Centers, EOP, and DRC will continue to hold space for folks to process, to breathe, and to come together as a community. We will support students in overcoming any barriers they encounter as a result of these and future unjust and oppressive actions. We encourage students to take advantage of support services and invite students to contact staff members by phone or email if you don’t feel comfortable coming into the office.

    Link to readable document here

     

    Educational Opportunity Programs eop.ucsc.edu

    Undocumented Student Services located at Educational Opportunity Programs:http://eop.ucsc.edu/undocumented_student_services/index.html

    Contact: Anna Campos <alcampos@ucsc.edu> 831-459-3048

    RESOURCE CENTERS resourcecenters.ucsc.edu

    Managing Director: Nancy I. Kim <nikim@ucsc.edu> 831-459-3790

    African American Resource and Cultural Center aarcc.ucsc.edu

    Director: Shonté Thomas <sfthomas@ucsc.edu> 831-459-3561

    American Indian Resource Center airc.ucsc.edu

    Director: Dr. Rebecca H. Rosser <rrosser@ucsc.edu> 831-459-2881

    Asian American/Pacific Islander Resource Center aapirc.ucsc.edu

    Director: Nancy I. Kim <nikim@ucsc.edu> 831-459-3790

    El Centro: Chicanx Latinx Resource Center elcentro.ucsc.edu

    Director (returning Feb. 27th): Dr. Judith Estrada <judi@ucsc.edu> 831-459-5608

    Interim Director (until Feb. 24th): Shonté Thomas <sfthomas@ucsc.edu> 831-459-3561

    Lionel Cantú Queer Center queer.ucsc.edu

    Director: Travis S. Becker <trbecker@ucsc.edu> 831-459-4385

    Women’s Center womenscenter.ucsc.edu

    Interim Director: Dr. Rebecca H. Rosser <rrosser@ucsc.edu> 831-459-2881

    Disability Resource Center drc.ucsc.edu

    Director: Richard Gubash <rgubash@ucsc.edu> 831-459-4202

     

    Counseling and Psychological Services caps.ucsc.edu


    To report hate or bias incidents: http://reporthate.ucsc.edu/index.html

     

    Published on January 30, 2017.


  • Lionel Cantú Queer Center's VOICE Program

  • The Lionel Cantú Queer Center strongly condemns and will move in opposition to Trump's new "VOICE" program. This program seeks to enhance a narrative that frames undocumented people as criminals.

    The announcement of this program continues this administration's terrorizing of the undocumented community. This is divisive, this is not normal, and this is wrong. We are here for our undocuqueer and our undocutrans community and always will be.

    If you're an undocumented student and need support, our office is here for you and a great first place to start is also the Undocumented Student Services Office: http://eop.ucsc.edu/undocumented_student_services/index.html

    Additionally, the UCSC Legal Services offers free consultations to students and their families with an immigration lawyer in the spring quarter on these dates:

    Monday, April 17 | 9 - 1:30 pm
    Tuesday, April 18 | 12:30 - 6 pm
    Tuesday, May 16 | 12:30 - 6 pm
    Wednesday, May 17 | 9 - 1:30 pm

    To make an appointment, or for questions, reach out to Legal Services by phone 831-459-4055 or e-mail ucsclegal@ucsc.edu.


  • UC President's Statement on DACA

  • UC President's Statement on DACA

    Earlier today, University of California President Janet Napolitano joined with California State University Chancellor Timothy White and Eloy Ortiz Oakley, chancellor-designate of the California Community College System, in calling upon President-elect Donald Trump to continue the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program and allow California and the nation’s DREAMers to continue to pursue their education.  A copy of the letter sent to President-elect Trump is attached.

    Immediately following the election, President Napolitano and the chancellors of the ten UC campuses released a public statement re-affirming the University’s absolute commitment to supporting all members of our community and adhering to UC’s Principles Against Intolerance. As the Principles make clear, the University “strives to foster an environment in which all are included” and “all are given an equal opportunity to learn and explore.” 

    The University of California will continue to pursue and protect these principles to ensure UC continues to be a welcoming and supportive environment for our undocumented students.

    As part of the University’s ongoing response to concerns about the continuation of the DACA program, President Napolitano recently announced that she has formed a working group to develop a systemwide approach to best protect our undocumented students and to fully examine DACA and other immigration issues as they may affect our students and campuses. President Napolitano will also be meeting with the undocumented student coordinators from each of the UC campuses this week to gather their input so that the University’s decisions are informed by the perspectives of UC’s undocumented students.

    If you have additional questions and comments regarding the letter sent to President-elect Trump or this issue, please contact

    For press release and/ or article recommend including additional information about the Undocumented Student Initiative including UC President Napolitano announces multi-year support for undocumented students - https://www.universityofcalifornia.edu/press-room/uc-president-napolitano-proposes-multi-year-support-undocumented-students.

    For Hill and federal GRD communications – Associate Vice President for Federal Governmental Relations Gary Falle at (202) 974-6319 or Gary.Falle@ucdc.edu

    For Federal agency communications –

    For immigration advocacy groups –

    For Sac and State GRD communications – Interim Associate Vice President Kieran Flaherty at (916) 445-9924 or Kieran.Flaherty@ucop.edu

    For campus, hospital and lab communications  - Executive Director of Strategic Communications Dianne Klein at (510) 987-0254 or Dianne.Klein@ucop.edu

    For Regents – UC Office of the President Chief of Staff Seth Grossman at (510) 587-6358 or Seth.Grossman@ucop.edu

    For UCSA – Jerlena Griffin-Desta, Deputy to the Vice President and Executive Director, Student Services at (510) 987-9756 or Jerlena.Griffin-desta@ucop.edu


  • UC Policy on Undocumented Community Members

  • UC Policy on Undocumented Community Members 

    The University of California today (Nov. 30) announced that it will vigorously protect the privacy and civil rights of the undocumented members of the UC community and will direct its police departments not to undertake joint efforts with any government agencies to enforce federal immigration law.

    “While we still do not know what policies and practices the incoming federal administration may adopt, given the many public pronouncements made during the presidential campaign and its aftermath, we felt it necessary to reaffirm that UC will act upon its deeply held conviction that all members of our community have the right to work, study, and live safely and without fear at all UC locations,” said UC President Janet Napolitano.

    The University issued its Statement of Principles in Support of Undocumented Members of the UC Community after Napolitano met earlier today with UC staff coordinators who support undocumented students at all 10 UC campuses. Napolitano also reviewed the recommendations of a UC task force that she established to study the most effective ways to protect undocumented students and other undocumented members of the UC community.

    The principles are to be implemented through policies and procedures at all UC campuses and medical facilities. They include the following:

    • The University will continue to admit students consistent with its nondiscrimination policies so that undocumented students will be considered for admission under the same criteria as U.S. citizens or permanent residents.
    • No confidential student records will be released without a judicial warrant, subpoena or court order unless authorized by the student or required by law.
    • No UC campus police department will undertake joint efforts with local, state or federal law enforcement agencies to investigate, detain or arrest individuals for violation of federal immigration law.
    • Campus police officers will not contact, detain, question or arrest any individual solely on the basis of (suspected) undocumented immigration status.
    • The University will not cooperate with any federal effort to create a registry of individuals based on any protected characteristics such as religion, national origin, race or sexual orientation.
    • UC medical centers will treat all patients without regard to race, religion, national origin, citizenship or other protected characteristics and will vigorously enforce nondiscrimination and privacy laws and policies

    The statement is also available online


  • Statement of Support for DACA Program

  • Statement in Support of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Program and our Undocumented Immigrant Students

    The core mission of higher education is the advancement of knowledge, people, and society. As educational leaders, we are committed to upholding free inquiry and education in our colleges and universities, and to providing the opportunity for all our students to pursue their learning and life goals.

    Since the advent of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in 2012, we have seen the critical benefits of this program for our students and the highly positive impacts on our institutions and communities. DACA beneficiaries on our campuses have been exemplary student scholars and student leaders, working across campus and in the community. With DACA, our students and alumni have been able to pursue opportunities in business, education, high tech, and the non-profit sector; they have gone to medical school, law school, and graduate schools in numerous disciplines. They are actively contributing to their local communities and economies.

    To our country’s leaders, we say that DACA should be upheld, continued, and expanded. We are prepared to meet with you to present our case. This is both a moral imperative and a national necessity. America needs talent – and these students, who have been raised and educated in the United States, are already part of our national community. They represent what is best about America, and as scholars and leaders, they are essential to the future.

    We call on our colleagues and other leaders across the business, civic, religious, and non-profit sectors to join with us in this urgent matter.

     

    UPDATE: We are pleased to share that Chancellor Blumenthal signed a support statement from college presidents across the country and 8 of the UC campuses. 


  • Joint Statement on Forcible Separation of Families and Detention of Children

  • STATEMENT FROM UCSC RESOURCE CENTERS

    The Resource Centers at UC Santa Cruz call for the immediate reunification of families and their children impacted by the “zero tolerance” policy at the US-Mexico border. The current administration’s inhumane practice of taking children from their families is an act of terrorism and we call on others to speak out. Forced family separations are not far removed from the historical practices of the US government, and they were unjust practices then as they remain now. Family separations contribute to intergenerational trauma that continues to affect many of our communities. Today, these practices continue to impact the most vulnerable among us, and many are hurting. Our children are hurting. The damage done to children and their families will unequivocally haunt them for their entire life and will have a long-lasting imprint that cannot be undone.

    The UCSC Resource Centers reiterate that we move in solidarity with, and will continue to advocate for immigrant families, Indigenous communities, Muslims, refugees, and undocumented citizens, queer and trans folk, people with disabilities, people of color, women and all people at the various intersections of these identities.  We recognize that students and campus community members may feel that our initial fears of hateful rhetoric during the elections have and continue to become a disturbing reality in policy and practice. We refuse to accept that these conditions are the new normal. We support community responses and are heartened by the voice and power of everyday people organizing.

    Resiliency has been an underlying force that has assured our existence. We are strong. We are resilient. We are here for you. We are moving forward together.

    The Resource Centers will continue to hold space for folks to process, to breathe, and to come together as a community. We will support students in overcoming any barriers they encounter as a result of these and future unjust and oppressive actions. We encourage students to take advantage of support services and invite students to contact staff members by phone or email if they don’t feel comfortable coming into the office.